• In the context of World Fibromyalgia Day, specialists remind us that this pathology “generates added suffering for patients, due to the social misunderstanding that is added to the pain, chronic fatigue or sleep problems, among other symptoms they suffer and which can be very disabling”.
  • Dr. Palop, who has treated more than 12,000 affected women throughout Spain, has participated in the monographic review of the fibromyalgia disease and the Fisterra Guide and highlights the value of “personalised attention to patients”.

The Ribera IMSKE hospital, the centre specialising in the locomotor system of the Ribera healthcare group, has activated its Fibromyalgia Unit with the incorporation of Dr. Vicente Palop as coordinator of the area, together with Dr. Patricia Roth. Both professionals have extensive experience in the treatment of this syndrome and have been working together for years, forming a professional tandem of recognised prestige in the field of fibromyalgia. Several professionals from Ribera IMSKE have also joined this unit to form a large multidisciplinary team that approaches this disease from all angles: physiotherapy, hydrotherapy, pain, nutrition and rheumatology. This unit also includes Arturo Aleis, nutritionist, and the physiotherapy team made up of Pablo Martínez, Jordi Llopis, and Mariano Soler, who join doctors Palop and Roth in this project, which opens on 8 May, just a few days before the commemoration of World Fibromyalgia Day. 

Dr. Palop is a professional with almost 30 years of experience in the treatment of what he defines as “a complex syndrome, which generates added suffering for patients due to the social misunderstanding that is added to the pain, chronic fatigue or sleep problems, among other symptoms they suffer and which can be very disabling”. She has treated more than 12,000 women throughout Spain and has participated in the monographic review of The fibromyalgia disease and the Fisterra Guide on this syndrome, both documents that are considered a reference at a national level and also in South America for the approach to this pathology.

It is estimated that there are around 900,000 people in Spain with fibromyalgia, an ailment that particularly affects women between the ages of 30 and 60, but is also diagnosed in younger people and men. However, according to the National Institute of Statistics, only around 276,000 patients have been diagnosed.

And it is precisely the complexity of this syndrome that makes it difficult to diagnose. Dr Palop explains that patients “have symptoms in different organs, which affects their mood, generates anxiety and even causes cognitive deterioration. “Often, a person with chronic pain does not sleep and is not even able to remember what they have done one day or who they have been with,” explains the fibromyalgia specialist at the Ribera IMSKE hospital.

Dr. Palop explains that at the Fibromyalgia Unit of the Ribera IMSKE hospital, patients undergo a complete assessment and a test to find out exactly what their symptoms are. And then “a personalised and comprehensive approach to treatment is proposed, which may include different specialities, always under the supervision of this specialised unit”. “It is important to remember that these patients have pain without an injury, such as a fracture. But it is fundamentally muscular and tendon pain, which they suffer 24 hours a day, and which has a significant impact on their state of mind, causing anxiety and depression in many cases,” she says, confirming the importance of a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach.